25.05.16. After two busy days, we left Atlanta. This is not a goodbye, because we really liked ette vibrant city that it is safe, has further evolved when will come back. Before leaving, we made ​​a last lap, driving along the famous Centennial Park which hosted the Olympics, folk art park that enlivens the device, the skyline which is definitely not tired and made ​​a stop at Terminus that is familiar fans of the series "Walking Dead". The largest drive-in of the world we mostly tested Varsity history (it is always full and the card is unbeatable, with sandwiches a few dollars). Bye bye Atlanta, we took the road early afternoon towards the Southeast.

The heat was scorching (in 35 ° C), with humidity that goes well ... we made a stop at Juliet, made famous by the movie "Fried Green Tomatoes" (1991) starring Kathy Bates and Chris O'Donnell , based on the novel of a resident. Basically just because this anecdote made us laugh in the preparation of our roadtrip. We were thrilled, and this pretty little town is straight into our top list of "small town character." There are plenty of small shops, very nice people who all display "welcome" to their trade, and train. We could not not go to taste the famous fried green tomatoes at the Whistle coffee, along the railway line. It was like being in another time, and it was a real culinary discovery is super good (and not fat).

A beautiful road, out of sight, took us to Macon (as in France, but without the hat on the "A", they are also twinned). Under a blazing sun, we joined and Jennifer Chandler, the Office of Tourism Macon, for a tour of the Ocmulgee National Monument. An ancient Indian site whose city is particularly proud, and that is special: contrary to what is usually found in the southwest (cliff houses and cave dwellings), it comes mounds (which were reconstituted). The film was interesting, and the tour rather well, despite the heat (we did some walking, the other drive), managing to dodge a whole because of college. We even saved a turtle crossing the road!

Reverted doublet, we went to get "lost" in Macon rather cute. The center brings together beautiful houses, the cemetery has immediate view of the river (Ocmulgee), and is also proud to have rocked an impressive number of musical geniuses, Otis Redding in mind (his statue, also at the edge of water plays his classics). We then went to settle in our Bed & Breakfast, a house Antebellum charm in class (this is not our preferred type of accommodation, but it's part of a roadtrip in the south and we start to s 'get used to). The B & B, the " 1842 Inn " (which hosted a galaxy of stars, Oprah Winfrey, an astronaut or Dr. of "The Love Boat") is wonderful and welcoming with onions: we nibbled delicious little things in rocking chairs before heading to the quest for sunset (rather vain for the design of the city).

We will not complain, but fatigue is a little ... feeling. It is written from the terrace of "The Rookery", a kind of popular brewery downtown, where it is leading to a small salad and donuts ... green tomato! It is almost 22 hours, and the barometer still shows more than 30 ° C!

05/26/2016. The night in our stylish B & B made ​​us a world of good, and we caught a lot of accumulated fatigue during the hectic stay in Atlanta. The pace is more sustained these days because we work in partnership with local tourist offices. The program is not imposed on us, we have concocted together. If we were in Atlanta alone, the staff at Macon wanted to accompany us in our visits. So we spent a good part of the day with Valerie and Chandler, and it was a pretty cool experience.

We started with the visit of two historic homes, almost neighbors. The first, Hay House, is a historic mansion of the nineteenth century, inhabited by three successive families whose characteristic is to be decorated in the European (and to be super well equipped in terms of heat management, with sliding doors everywhere and beautiful stained glass windows).

The second Canonball, has a rather legendary history locally: it is almost more evident (from a small impact on the ironwork of the gate), but received a shell during the Civil War (which did not explode). His last heir could no longer maintain it, it was bought by a sorority (brotherhood girls) who allowed to stay in a room upstairs, where she sent the key to visitors who wanted to enter the museum.

When it came out, it was still the scorching heat. We went to lunch at a Macon institution: the "H & H", a restaurant soul food more than fifties, serving various formulas every day with choice of meat (their specialty is fried chicken) and several accompanying choice , washed down with lemonade, for less than $ 10. A good plan, history and more. The place is also closely linked to that of the local star group of the city, the Allman Brothers. The owner of the restaurant, Mama Hill, nourished before they knew them.

To digest, it is then returned to the center of Macon to see a shop that interested us: that of Otis Redding Foundation, another native son. Here we organize a run festival held in September and a musical summer camp for young people; it is also a mini-museum with newspaper clippings, photos and a gift-shop dedicated to the singer of the legendary "Sittin 'on the dock of the bay." But what interested us is that the place is run by his family! so we chat with Justin (Andrews), his son-small (the son of his daughter). Yelma his wife is still in the house too. He showed us a rare video of Otis Redding in the streets of Macon or clowning his ranch (the "Big O").

Without changing theme is continued with the "Big House", the museum dedicated to the Allman Brothers, famous here to be considered the founders of Southern rock (basically known as Redding is with us and vice versa). We thoroughly enjoyed: the museum is really well done, lots of old posters, pictures ... and logo, a psychedelic mushroom (guess why). The group, composed of several members around the Allman Brothers, was at his peak in the 1970s and marked by several tragedies and death. Only one brother is still alive.

The other is with one of his friends, Rosehill Cemetery where one is returned pilgrimage. This place (designed quite specifically) many marked the band's career: in addition to their tombstones, there is that topped by a statue of a little girl (who inspired their song "Little Martha"), that of Elizabeth, along the railway and the river, where they are invited their girlfriends (...) or that of a man named Bond, who found himself on the cover of one of their albums.

Macon in the rearview mirror, we took a road which promised long (4 hours) to St. Marys. We went out to the highway as soon as one has been able, through Mount Vernon, Jesup, etc. Buccolique places, also very (very right) to others. We followed the sunset on Golden isles before arriving at our base for the night: the Riverview Hotel , the best advantage of being right across from the ferry. We walked three races to make a picnic on Cumberland Island where we go tomorrow