"Frantz"

July 9, 2017
Time:

Screens at 2PM, 5PM, and 7:30PM Discussion after the first screening


Price: $5.00 General Admission

Douglass Theatre
355 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd
Macon, GA
Phone: 478-742-2000

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Screens at 2PM, 5PM, & 7:30PM
Frantz (France-Germany. Drama-history-war, 113 minutes, rated PG-13). 
In a German village shortly after the end of WWI, a Frenchman and former soldier named Adrien (Pierre Niney) arrives and is met with hostility. That changes slowly when he introduces himself to the parents and fiancée, Anna (Paula Beer), of Frantz, a young German who died in the trenches. Adrien says they became great friends in Paris before the war. Shot mainly in black-and-white, with some sequences in color, this change-of-pace film for French director In a German village shortly after the end of WWI, a Frenchman and former soldier named Adrien (Pierre Niney) arrives and is received with suspicion and downright hostility. That changes slowly when he introduces himself to the parents and fiancée, Anna (Paula Beer), of Frantz, a young German who died in the trenches. Adrien says they became great friends in Paris before the war. Shot mainly in black-and-white, with some sequences in color, this change-of-pace film for François Ozon (“In the House”). “Can carefully constructed lies heal the emotional wounds of war? That unsettling question goes to the heart of ‘Frantz,’ François Ozon’s sleek, somber adaptation of Ernst Lubitsch’s 1932 antiwar film, ‘Broken Lullaby,’ set in Germany and France in the aftermath of World War I. I won’t reveal the lie that propels the story except to say that it’s a whopper. For an antiwar film, ‘Frantz’ is low-key. It doesn’t rub your face in gore or stir your adrenaline; there are no battle scenes, and only fleeting images of ruined cities and wounded soldiers; and a mood of bitterness, despair and exhaustion prevails.… In its early scenes, ‘Frantz’ sustains the mood of a solemn, romantic period piece whose dignified melancholy is deepened by Philippe Rombi’s Mahler-influenced soundtrack, sighing discreetly in the background. At crucial moments, this mostly black-and-white film breaks into color. The first blush occurs when Adrien mentions Frantz’s favorite canvas, a Manet painting of a man with his head thrown back. When that work is finally shown, it depicts a young man’s suicide. By the time Adrien returns to Paris, he and Anna have developed a deep unvoiced attraction… In its second  half, the film becomes a modernist fable, a kind of multiple-choice question that, in the light of today’s ambiguous moral climate rife with terms like truthiness, alternative facts and fake news, throws the past into shadowy half-light.” -- New York Times
Trailer:  https://youtu.be/Mytb1Ms7KLI
 

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"Frantz"